How Trump’s Regulation Skeptic Helps Wall Street Navigate the Rules – Wall Street Journal

How Trump’s Regulation Skeptic Helps Wall Street Navigate the Rules – Wall Street Journal

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Wall Street Journal

How Trump’s Regulation Skeptic Helps Wall Street Navigate the Rules
Wall Street Journal
WASHINGTON—Paul Atkins is Wall Street’s regulation whisperer. The man tapped by President-elect Donald Trump to oversee his early financial deregulation strategy has spent the past seven years counseling clients how to influence …

From Brexit to Trump, 2017 will be dominated by the decisions we made last year – The Independent

From Brexit to Trump, 2017 will be dominated by the decisions we made last year – The Independent

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As we look forward to 2017, the next year will be dominated by the changes set in train in 2016. In Britain, whatever the decision of the Supreme Court in January, the Article 50 procedure for leaving the European Union is almost certain to be triggered by the end of March – hence the focus in the Prime Minister’s New Year message, speaking of what her priorities will be “when I sit around the negotiating table in Europe this year”. Those negotiations are going to absorb the greater part of the Government’s energy and attention over the coming 12 to 24 months. 

Theresa May says that her aim in those talks is to “get the right deal – not just for those who voted to leave, but for every single person in this country”. This is an admirable objective, but her declaration that “we are no longer the 52 per cent who voted Leave and the 48 per cent who voted Remain but one great union of people and nations with a proud history and a bright future” is an aspiration rather than a statement of fact. 

The nation is still divided. Those who voted to Remain, by and large, still think that leaving the EU is a mistake. The Independent still believes it is a mistake. That does not mean that we refuse to accept the decision of the people, but it does mean that we should be cautious as we proceed. We should seek to mitigate the damaging effects of leaving the EU, and as a nation we should try to keep our options open. 

We want to lend more power to the elbow of Philip Hammond, the Chancellor, who wisely argues for a transitional agreement after Britain leaves the EU in 2019. This would preserve some of the advantages of EU membership after we have left, and give us more time to negotiate the complex trade deals needed with the EU and the rest of the world. 

If, after we have left, there is a big shift in public opinion, it would be open to a sovereign people to change its mind and to seek to rejoin a (possibly reformed) EU, but there is no point in arguing for a second referendum now. 

Equally, the idea of an electoral alliance against Brexit, or against a hard Brexit, is one that should be judged case by case. It made sense for the Greens to stand aside for the Liberal Democrats in the Richmond Park by-election, but the situation in the forthcoming by-election in Copeland is less clear. 

In the meantime it is interesting that Ms May also pledges to repair other “divisions in our country” – between “those who can easily buy their own home, send their children to a great school, find a secure job, and those who cannot”. This commitment to social justice is welcome, although we are doubtful that she has the right policies to deliver it. 

If we were asked our priorities for 2017, we would add a greater spirit of liberal tolerance, which ought to have been compatible with a Leave vote although Ms May does not appear to think so. And we would hope for swift action on the Paris Agreement on climate change, which came into force in November after it was ratified by enough states the previous month.

Which brings us to the United States, where on 20 January the decision of the American people in 2016 will take effect as Donald Trump is sworn in as the 45th President. The question of climate change will be an important early test for the new administration. It is also a big test for rules-bound global politics, because the US has already ratified the Paris Agreement, as has China. Mr Trump has described the scientific consensus on climate change as a “hoax”, so this is one policy on which we hope that the checks and balances of the American system are stronger than the rhetorical description of the presidency as the most powerful office in the world. 

It may be tempting for us Europeans to hope that Mr Trump will concentrate on his programme of rebuilding American infrastructure and bringing new jobs to the left-behind states of the Midwest. But it would be a mistake to imagine that American isolationism would benefit the rest of the world. It would only create a vacuum that Vladimir Putin might seek to fill. 

Instead, we have to hope that Mr Trump is not as intolerant and as impulsive as he has sometimes seemed, and that the wisdom of the US constitution will constrain him. 

We wish you, the reader, a happy, tolerant and sustainable New Year.

Britons must unite after their “divisive” Brexit, Theresa May says in New Year message – Telegraph.co.uk

Britons must unite after their “divisive” Brexit, Theresa May says in New Year message – Telegraph.co.uk

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Britain needed to come together, she said: “As the fantastic MP Jo Cox, who was so tragically taken from us last year, put it: ‘We are far more united and have far more in common than that which divides us’.”

The Prime Minister said the UK was positioned to seize the “great opportunities” ahead in 2017 as the country formally starts the process of leaving the EU.

She said: “We have made a momentous decision and set ourselves on a new direction. And if 2016 was the year you voted for that change, this is the year we start to make it happen.

“I know that the referendum last June was divisive at times. I know, of course, that not everyone shared the same point of view, or voted in the same way.

“But I know too that, as we face the opportunities ahead of us, our shared interests and ambitions can bring us together.”

Mrs May wanted to see a Britain in which “we are no longer the 52 per cent who voted Leave and the 48 per cent who voted Remain, but one great union of people and nations with a proud history and a bright future.

“So, when I sit around the negotiating table in Europe this year, it will be with that in mind – the knowledge that I am there to get the right deal – not just for those who voted to Leave – but for every single person in this country.”

New Illinois Laws 2017: BUSINESS, COMMERCE, LABOR AND REGULATION – Patch.com

New Illinois Laws 2017: BUSINESS, COMMERCE, LABOR AND REGULATION – Patch.com

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Patch.com

New Illinois Laws 2017: BUSINESS, COMMERCE, LABOR AND REGULATION
Patch.com
Illinois Department of Financial Regulation may not deny a request for a professional license solely on the basis of an applicant’s criminal record unless he or she was convicted of a crime directly related to the occupation for which the license is

and more »

Teacher shortages fuelled by Brexit threat to EU nationals – The Guardian

Teacher shortages fuelled by Brexit threat to EU nationals – The Guardian

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The risk posed to schools by Britain’s departure from the European Union is revealed as new figures show that the number of EU nationals who have qualified to teach in England has more than doubled since 2010.

During a time when the government has repeatedly failed to meet its teacher recruitment targets, data suggests foreign nationals have increasingly been drafted in to fill in gaps.

Theresa May has refused to give EU nationals in Britain any assurances that they will continue to be welcome. There are also growing concerns in education that the government’s silence will put off possible future recruits from the EU.

Department for Education figures show that close to 5,000 teachers from EU countries qualified to teach last year, up from just over 2,000 in 2010. The largest numbers came from Spain, Greece, Poland and Romania. The number from Greece has shot up more than sixfold – from 88 to 572 – since 2010. Yet, despite the influx, the DfE has failed to hit necessary recruitment levels for a fifth year in a row, it was revealed last week. There were not enough trainee teachers starting courses this September in three-quarters of subjects, with maths, physics, design and technology, computing and business studies all falling.

Meanwhile, more than 50,000 teachers left the profession before retirement last year, the highest number for more than a decade. More teachers are leaving the job than joining, with almost a quarter leaving within their first three years.

Shadow schools minister Mike Kane said he feared that the government’s policy on EU nationals could further jeopardise schools’ ability to fill staff shortages. “The Tories are failing to train enough teachers for our schools and it is EU teachers that are helping to plug the gap,” he said. “It is appalling that the prime minister won’t guarantee the legal status of these teachers that are helping with our skills shortages. It is our children that will pay the price for this shameless politicking.”

Professor John Howson, a government adviser on teacher recruitment, said that in recent years, with pressures on funding, headteachers had looked to teachers from eastern Europe in particular to ease staffing shortages. He said: “I suspect that quite a lot of recruitment agencies have been operating particularly in places like Romania and Bulgaria, where the standards in teaching maths are probably quite high.”

In June, the cross-party public accounts committee of MPs criticised the DfE for having no plan to meet its targets.

The DfE claims to be investing more than £1.3bn over this parliament “to attract the brightest and best into teaching”. While the government admits that there are challenges, recruitment was up by 12% in maths in 2016 compared with 2015 and by 15% in physics.

Big business groups vow to make Brexit a success – Telegraph.co.uk

Big business groups vow to make Brexit a success – Telegraph.co.uk

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Britain’s five biggest business groups have joined forces for the first time and promised to make a success of Brexit as the UK starts the process of leaving the European Union.

In a letter to The Sunday Telegraph, the five organisations, which speak for companies employing more than half of workers in the private sector, around 13 million people working in manufacturing, services, construction and agriculture, pledged to work with firms from “all corners of Britain”.

Companies large and small are “committed to making 2017 a year of progress and success”, to grasp new opportunities and “overcome the challenges that lie ahead”, the letter said.

The five – the Confederation of British Industry (CBI), British Chambers of Commerce (BCC), Institute of Directors (IoD), Federation of Small Businesses (FSB) and EEF, the manufacturers’ organisation – represent more than 400,000 UK businesses.

Nigel Farage – The Movie: Warner Brothers in talks to make Brexit campaign film – Telegraph.co.uk

Nigel Farage – The Movie: Warner Brothers in talks to make Brexit campaign film – Telegraph.co.uk

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Get ready for Nigel Farage… the movie. The Hollywood film-maker behind the Harry Potter franchise is in talks about making a film of the former Ukip leader’s campaign to take Britain out of the European Union.

Warner Brothers, one of the world’s most successful film studios, is in talks with Arron Banks, the insurance millionaire who funded Leave.EU, about a film based on his diary of the successful campaign.

Andy Wigmore, a spokesman for Mr Banks, said: “We have had some very serious Hollywood people in touch with us who are going to buy the rights to the book. They want to buy the option on it.”

Producers from Warner Brothers – the studio behind the Harry Potter spin-off “Fantastic Beasts And Where To Find Them” – are hoping to meet Mr Farage and Mr Banks when they next visit the United States, for the inauguration of US President-elect Donald Trump later in January.

Mr Banks’ diary, titled the “Bad Boys of Brexit”, which charts the highs and lows of the campaign has proved to be an unexpected hit in the bookshops.

Mr Wigmore said that while the producers “have done a bit of research… effectively that book is like a screenplay so half the work has been done for them”.